Ret. gen. Dionesio R. Santiago: from PDEA to Dangerous Drugs Board

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DAVAO CITY, Philippines —  Retired gen. Dionesio Santiago, the former chief   of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency  is now the director  of the country’s Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB).

President Rodrigo Duterte has appointed Santiago as DDB chairman. The later ran and lost in his senatorial bid last 2016 elections.

Santiago’s appointment came after the one year ban election ban for political candidates in the 2016 elections.

Duterte supported Santiago’s candidacy and vice versa.

In a statement, presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella stated  “General Santiago’s return to the national government with his appointment to the DDB will greatly contribute to the President’s vision of a drug-free Philippines.”

Duterte has always mentioned Santiago as his source of the drugs statistics saying he got briefers from Santiago about the illegal drugs trade in the country.

Santiago will replace Benjamin Reyes who was sacked by Duterte after presenting contradicting figures on statistics of illegal drug users.

Who is Santiago?

  • He served as PDEA chief from 2006 to 2010;
  • He served as Bureau of Corrections director from 2003 to 2004;
  • Philippine Army commanding general from March to November 2002;
  • Central Command Visayas commanding general from July 2001 to March 2002;
  • Commanding general of the Special Operations Command from 1999 to 2001.
  • Served as assistant military attaché in Malaysia;
  • Serve as attaché at the Philippine consulate in Seattle, USA;
  • Chief of the Army’s Special Operations Command (Socom);
  • Head of the AFP’s Task Force Libra. The task force secured Malacañang when supporters of ousted President Joseph Estrada stormed the Palace on May 1 last year.

Santiago joined the Philippine Military academy in 1966.

“His expertise and advocacy is fighting illegal drugs, which became his platform when he ran in the last elections,” Abella added.-Editha Z. Caduaya/Newsline.ph

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