Davao Security Office inspects chemical warehouses

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Davao City — To prevent a Beirut-like explosion of stored chemicals, the Davao City Public Safety and Security Command Center (PSSCC) has joined forces with police and three other agencies in inspecting the storage of combustible chemicals in the city’s warehouses. 

This, after PSSCC chief Angel Sumagaysay received a communication from the Bureau of Customs that some business establishments and industries are storing regulated chemicals such as Ammonium Nitrate. 

As a preventive measure, PSSCC together with the Davao City Police Office (DCPO), Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP), the City Business Bureau, and the Davao City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office initiated inspections to ensure that the chemicals are stored properly and safely to avoid potential damages due to improper handling.

“As a preventive measure, we are conducting an inspection on all of the warehouses or facilities storing Ammonium Nitrate in the city, so that we won’t experience an explosion just like what happened in Beirut, Lebanon last August. There were damages and loss of lives because of improper handling or storing of the chemical called Ammonium Nitrate,” he said.

It can be recalled that the recent explosion in Beirut, Lebanon was caused by some stored ammonium nitrate killing at least 100 people and 4,000 injured and huge damage to properties.

“According to the guidelines and safety protocols set by the Philippine National Police, these chemicals should be stored in a place with proper ventilation. The room should be lighted following the specifications. The storage facility should have a lock and CCTV,” Sumagaysay said. 

He added that after every inspection, corrections and recommendations are given to every establishment to improve how they should store the chemicals and ensure that safety protocols are strictly implemented.

The inspections are ongoing on all the warehouses or storage facilities listed by the DCPO.-Newsline with CIO report

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